Data Body|Body Data

Check out Google Body.

Interesting to think of possibilities of mapping info to a body using kml. Could be used to describe fashion, diseases, or a ‘data body’ in the sense we’ve been discussing.

Bicycle Built for Two Thousand Using Mechanical Turk

Amazon Mechanical Turk was used to make 2,000 people sing ‘Daisy Bell’ in HAL style, unbeknownst to them (by imitating a sound.)  Great creative use of an interesting site.

Sunvox Modular Synthesizer Program (Free!)

Pretty sweet program.  Free on computers, $5 on iPhone or iPad.  Drag and drop interface, with a simple looping seqencer.  Sunvox

Check out this youtube video of how to make a simple, endlessly self-modifying song using the system’s built-in probabilistic note modification feature.

 

Very cool if this could integrate with a softVNS interface!

Humans as inforgs: Floridi’s 4th Revolution

Abstract

In this paper I argue that recent technological transformations in the life-cycle of information have brought about a fourth revolution, in the long process of reassessing humanity’s fundamental nature and role in the universe. We are not immobile, at the centre of the universe (Copernicus); we are not unnaturally distinct and different from the rest of the animal world (Darwin); and we are far from being entirely transparent to ourselves (Freud). We are now slowly accepting the idea that we might be informational organisms among many agents (Turing), inforgs not so dramatically different from clever, engineered artefacts, but sharing with them a global environment that is ultimately made of information, the infosphere. This new conceptual revolution is humbling, but also exciting. For in view of this important evolution in our self-understanding, and given the sort of IT-mediated interactions that humans will increasingly enjoy with their environment and a variety of other agents, whether natural or synthetic, we have the unique opportunity of developing a new ecological approach to the whole of reality.

http://www.philosophyofinformation.net/publications/pdf/ainfacatfr.pdf

An Information-Integration Theory of Consciousness

Paper by Tononi in BMC Neuroscience:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15522121

Figure 4
Information integration and complexes for other neural-like architectures. a. Schematic of a cerebellum-like organization. Shown are three modules of eight elements each, with many feed forward and lateral connections within each module but minimal connections among them. The analysis of complexes reveals three separate complexes with low values of Φ (Φ = 20 bits). There is also a large complex encompassing all the elements, but its Φ value is extremely low (Φ = 5 bits). b. Schematic of the organization of a reticular activating system. Shown is a single subcortical “reticular” element providing common input to the eight elements of a thalamocortical-like main complex (both specialized and integrated, Φ = 61 bits). Despite the diffuse projections from the reticular element on the main complex, the complex comprising all 9 elements has a much lower value of Φ (Φ = 10 bits). c. Schematic of the organization of afferent pathways. Shown are three short chains that stand for afferent pathways. Each chain connects to a port-in of a main complex having a high value of Φ (61 bits) that is thalamocortical-like (both specialized and integrated). Note that the afferent pathways and the elements of the main complex together constitute a large complex, but its Φ value is low (Φ = 10 bits). Thus, elements in afferent pathways can affect the main complex without belonging to it. d. Schematic of the organization of efferent pathways. Shown are three short chains that stand for efferent pathways. Each chain receives a connection from a port-out of the thalamocortical-like main complex. Also in this case, the efferent pathways and the elements of the main complex together constitute a large complex, but its Φ value is low (Φ = 10 bits). e. Schematic of the organization of cortico-subcortico-cortical loops. Shown are three short chains that stand for cortico-subcortico-cortical loops, which are connected to the main complex at both ports-in and ports-out. Again, the subcortical loops and the elements of the main complex together constitute a large complex, but its Φ value is low (Φ = 10 bits). Thus, elements in loops connected to the main complex can affect it without belonging to it. Note, however, that the addition of these three loops slightly increased the Φ value of the main complex (from Φ = 61 to Φ = 63 bits) by providing additional pathways for interactions among its elements.

Algorithm = Logic + Control

http://www.emcl-study.eu/fileadmin/downloads/Kowalski-ACM-1979.pdf

 

A seminal paper on Algorithms from the proceedings of the ACM in 1979.

Conceptual Map of Complexity Research

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